Script and Music

Music Closeup

Neumes developed into more definite shapes, called ligatures, that could dictate rhythmical values, as well as being placed on specific lines to delineate pitch. This type of squared notation without stems became one of the most regularly used notational systems in chant music for the next several centuries. The notational system featured throughout the Stuart Library Gradual is an example of this notation but further developed, which can further confirm the possibility of its origins in the sixteenth century, or earlier.  

Carolingian Miniscule Font

The type of script used throughout the gradual closely resembles a script known as Caroline or Carolingian Miniscule. Named after emperor Charlemagne, this script was popular with royal, noble, and ecclesiastical patronage for its uniformity and clarity. . Caroline Miniscule was usually reserved for Latin and Old English texts. The script’s distinctive features include a rounded aspect to the script that emphasizes uniform head and baselines.

Script and Music